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Posts Tagged ‘S&P 500’

This should be an interesting week in the markets.  We have the end of the quarter which typically produces some volatility for the market.  We also have the very important unemployment report that will be due out on Friday.  The unemployment indicator has become one of most important monthly indicators.  Although employment is considered a lagging indicator (an indicator that is one of the last to recover), its continued weakness might be signaling a bigger problem.  In his weekly newsletter John Mauldin wrote about the unemployment situation from another perspective.  To sign up for John’s free newsletter go to www.frontlinethoughts.com

He wrote that it takes the creation of 15 million jobs just to get us back to normal employment around 5%.  He makes that estimate by assuming the monthly job destruction will soon becoming to an end.  I think that he estimates another 500,000 jobs will be lost.  He writes, “that means that to get back to 5% unemployment within five years we need to see, on average, the creation of 250,000 jobs per month.  As an Average!!”   

Then he states these statistics:

“If you take the best year, which was 2006, you get an average monthly growth of 232,000. If you average the ten years from 1999, you get average monthly job growth of 50,000. If you take the average job growth from 1989 until now, you get an average of 91,000 a month. If you take the best ten years I could find, which would be 1991-2000, the average is still only 150,000. That is a long way from 250,000.”

I equate the destruction in employment much like a perfect storm.  The damage has been so great that it will take a long time to recover.  Both the Bush and the Obama Administrations allowed the unemployment situation to get this bad without doing anything about it.  In fact, I still don’t see anything in the works to fix this problem.  The stimulus bill will create mostly government based jobs.  However, I don’t think it will create enough to even put a dent in these numbers.

So, do you think that the market already expects the unemployment situation to remain this ugly?  Of course, there is the notion of a job-less recovery (which that has never made sense).  However, I think that this situation goes well beyond a typical unemployment problem.  Can the market continue to remain positive in the midst of so many people being affected by lack of employment?  I personally think that we see this problem manifest slowly and at some point the markets feel the impact. 

I know that this is far from positive but it is important to see all sides so that you can make prudent decisions with retirement dollars.

Levels to Watch on the S&P 500

From time to time, I like to point out important price levels on the S&P 500. 

Above 1080 – Positive

Between 1080 and 1043 – Neutral

Below 1041-Negative

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A recent article in the Dallas Morning News states that we just don’t have anything to worry about going forward regarding a “double dip” recession.  A double dip recession is one where you go through one recession, the recession concludes, and then it comes back again.  Of course, that would mean that the stock market would come tumbling down again as well.

September 14, 2009 edition

“I can now report that it’s time to lift up your melancholy spirits and go find something else to worry about.  Double-dip recessions are very rare events.”

“Since WWII, there are really no examples-except 1980-82….”

The writer also points out that, “you would think a 50% upside prance in the stock market would be met with some measure of confidence rather than such an undercurrent of distrust.”

The biggest mistake that the media is making in the reporting of this recession is comparing it to normal recessions and normal cycles.  The writer would need to go back further than 70 years to take a look at the full length of the Great Depression to get a better comparison. No, I don’t think that we are spiraling into a depression.  I do think that in the least a double dip recession is a high probability. 

People are distrustful regardless of the rise in the stock market.  There is rampant unemployment, a foreclosure crisis, and consumers faced with mountains of debt.  That is not even considering a Congress that is trying to ruin this country through socialistic policies. 

To get a good comparison, you can’t look at post WWII recessions.  It would be a lot like comparing apples to oranges.  This is what makes this situation so dangerous.  Yes, people are distrustful.  At the same time, people are also hopeful.  They are hopeful that the worst is behind us.  If that doesn’t turn out to be the case, confidence will be destroyed and that will be the biggest problem the markets and the economy face.  Today, at least confidence is on life support after a grueling 2008. 

Levels in the Market

I haven’t covered significant levels in the stock market in a long time.  (Click here for a description of what I mean by levels.) For the S&P 500, we are starting down a few key levels that are right in front of us.  It is a range of levels between 1042 and 1062.  The ability for the stock market to get above 1062 and stay there would be a very bullish event. 

Isn’t a rise of 55% in the stock market a bullish event in itself?  Only if the bear market is over.  Thus far, the levels necessary to declare the intermediate trend change from a bear to a bull have not occurred.  It would take the S&P 500 getting over and staying over the level of 1119 for that to occur.

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Back in March of this year when the stock market found a bottom, I posed a question that I felt would be “the” question for investors. Is this a bear market rally or is this the beginning of a bull market?

I have felt all along that this is nothing more than a bear market rally. A bear market rally is a pause in the bear market where the stock market goes up for a period of time.  Think of it as the bear resting and gathering energy for the next big decline. 

Of course, if it is a new bull market, then the March low of this year was the worst that it will get. 

I believe that we might be getting close to finding out.  Many of the indicators are stating that the moment of truth is here.  If this were a healthy normal market, we would at least see some type of market decline in the course of a new bull market.   I think that we might have already started that process.  If this is a bear market rally, then this decline will morph into something serious.  This should be a big test. 

For this stock market to change from a bear to a bull, the important level for the S&P 500 to reach would be 1121.  The S&P 500 would have to surpass that level and stay above that level.  If that were to occur, the evidence would support a major change for the stock market trend.

The unemployment numbers came out again this past Friday and showed more disturbing news for the economy.  Remember, if they cannot fix unemployment, this economy is going to have a tough time getting going again.  Unfortunately, Obama’s answer to more jobs is Government jobs through the stimulus program.  That is not the type of solution that will solve this problem.   

According to the Government’s “version” of the unemployment report, we lost 216,000 jobs. Of course, that was after they “added” back in 118,000 jobs that they created out of thin air.  As a review, each month the Government “estimates” the number of jobs created each month that they “feel” the Department of Labor misses.  It is such a farce. 

The number of those jobless as well as the overall unemployment rate is much higher than reported.  It is an absolute joke that they continue to report this garbage. 

I wanted to give you a link to an article about Robert Prechter.  He is a well regarded market analyst that has called major tops and bottoms of the market.  He uses a discipline called the Elliot Wave Theory. According to Elliot Wave, we have again hit a major top and it is about to get ugly.  Who knows if this is right or not?  I do know that he has a very strong track record and warrants some attention. 

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The recession is declared to be over or over soon states many media outlets on Friday.  Unemployment was not as bad as expected and it appears that we are starting to lose less jobs. All of that is good news and it took the media and Wall Street no time at all to react positively. 

 

I really do regret taking the opposing view on this one.  I would like for it to be true.  There are just a few problems.  We have 14.462 million people unemployed.  The number is likely higher. This is the estimate from the Department of Labor.  Where are these people going to get jobs?  Unless you are ready to pick up a shovel and get on the Obama job creation bus, you might just be out of luck.  Once again, the Obama administration does not have a plan in place to fix the job situation. 

 

Looking back to 1948 (as far back as records take us), there has never been as big of a spike in the number of those unemployed.  The closest spike that you can find was between 1979 and 1982.  In 43 months, the unemployment numbers jumped 106% to a high of 12.051 million people. Today, in just 33 months the unemployment numbers jumped 125% to 14.462 million.  The following is a chart from www.freelunch.com that illustrates this dramatic rise.

I think that the monthly unemployment numbers could continue to look better.  However, that doesn’t mean that companies are hiring. I think that it means that companies have cut as far as they can cut.  Those lay-offs might start to slow.  Until there is a solution to the problem that over 14 million people are facing, we will continue to have this crisis. 

 

Regarding the market…the 1929 comparison that I wrote about still tracks very closely.  I would still suggest that there is extreme risk on the table.  As long as we stay below 1020 on the S&P 500, that will remain the case.

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Those of you who have been reading my analysis are probably wondering when I am going to throw in the towel and just admit that the bear market is over and start talking about buying stocks again.  Well, I hate to disappoint you.  It is not going to happen yet.  Let’s take a much bigger picture look at what is occurring.  First, we are in a financial crisis produced by the bear market and those don’t just go away without a strong fight. 

Second, how could a 40% plus rise in stocks not mean the bear market is over?  Well, let’s take a look at history for that answer.  In 1929, a bear market started as a result of a credit/debt crisis.  There are many similarities between that period and today.  The big difference is the type of debt crisis.  The bear market eventually bottomed in 1932 after an 86% decline.  The first “crisis” decline in 1929 saw the market drop -44%.  Following that -44% decline, the stock market went up 46% over the next 147 days.  If you compare that to today, we are going through a similar experience.  The crisis of last year resulted in a -48% decline.  Thus far we are a little over a 40% increase in the stock market over 137 days.   This is not in any way unprecedented.  The problem for stock market investors in 1929 was what followed the 46% increase.  Following that incredible stock market rally was an -82% loss over the next 3 years. 

Third, the market has been rising over the past two weeks as a result of earnings season reports.  Over 70% of the companies of the S&P 500 have reported better than expected profits.  However, a closer look would reveal that the vast majority of these “profits” were due to cost cutting and not real growth.  These are clearly not sustainable. 

Fourth, Wall Street is beating the drum that the recession is just about over.  The index of leading indicators came out last week “and is rising at a rate that has accurately indicated the end of every other recession since the index began being compiled in 1959” (Dallas Morning News).  Is that really valid when we are dealing with the worst recession since 1929 when no leading indicator index was even around? It is important to compare apples to apples.  Wall Street has a history of claiming the recession over prematurely many times before.

Finally, unemployment is a major crisis and there is nothing in the works to fix it.  Of course, you can always get a job working an Obama induced construction job. 

Let’s not get to ahead of ourselves.  I was premature to write that the stock market rally was nearing the end.  Obviously it still has more to go.  I don’t think that I am wrong to suggest the bear market is over.

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Have you heard of CIT Group?  CIT is a company that lends money to about 1 million small and medium size businesses and has about 40 billion dollars in debt. They are a pretty big player in the lending business, a company mired in debt, a company on the verge of collapse. 

In the event they fail, there could be some pretty significant repercussions throughout the financial system.  Of course, they are not on the same scale as the Lehman Brothers. However, with a financial system on shaky ground, who knows what would result in the collapse of a large lender.  So, a company in trouble should be no big deal.  After all, President Obama is in the bail-out business and hasn’t had a good bail-out in a while now. 

No, not this time.  Poor little CIT doesn’t meet the too big to fail test.  President Obama stated that it had set “high standards” for granting aid to companies and leaving private investors as the one alternative to avoid collapse.  Wait a minute, excuse me while I settle down from that good laugh I had while writing. 

Since when does this administration have standards?  They still think that GM is a good business model.  So will CIT go into bankruptcy if Big Brother doesn’t lend them a hand?  Of course not, because Big Brother is going to lend them a hand.  The secret is that they are going to do it behind closed doors.  Yes, this is what is happening to our taxpayer dollars.  Roughly 7 of their big bondholders are in talks to cough up 3 billion or so to place another band-aid on the festering wound. 

Where do you think that these bondholders get their money?  With the banking system pretty much nationalized, the money easily funnels from the Government through these banks to these troubled companies.  Obama can keep his “high standards” and no problems to deal with in the financial sector.  They have been running the same system with AIG since that major entity was nationalized.

Price Levels

Let’s take a look at price levels. Last week I warned that things were looking bleak for the market.  As soon as I wrote the warning and hit send, the market turned around and put in a big week.  So does that mean we are out of the woods in the near-term?  Well, last week was the one week out of the month that we have options expiration.  Options expiration can be a real dramatic week either positively or negatively.  It is misleading to see the results of options expiration as what is really occurring with the market.

The next significant price level we are looking at is 956.  The S&P 500 has entered into a price level “zone” (over 940) and now we will really see what this market is made of.  Any strength carrying the S&P 500 over 956 could indicate that we are heading towards 1000.

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Well, I took the wrong time to take a vacation. A great deal of very important things occurred last week in the stock market and investors should be extremely cautious.  This morning I will take some time to get you caught up on what is occurring with price levels as well as what I believe to be a fundamental shift in the stock market. The stock market has been in a stock market rally from the middle of March at least until June 11. Since June 11, the S&P 500 has declined -7 %.

One of the themes that I have written about since the low in the stock market in March is the overall future direction of the stock market. If you ask most people on Wall Street, they will say the worst is behind us and we have started a period of recovery. I have argued the opposite. I feel that we are in a long-term bear market that started in 2000 and could last as long as 18 to 20 years (based on history).  Concerning out current situation, my analysis would suggest we have been in a bear market rally. This is a period of time where the stock market stops declining and starts what looks like a period of prosperity and recovery for investors.

These are mean periods of time for investors because they fool the vast majority of people into believing that the worst is behind us. When you look at how far up the stock market went in a small amount of time, it certainly would appear that the worst is behind us. At the same time, it also looks just like a typical bear market rally and not the start of a period of recovery.

Since the March low in the stock market, the question has been how long and how far the stock market will go up. It is a little too early to declare that the stock market rally is over. However, the evidence is building. The problems are becoming much too loud to ignore. So, let’s start with the evidence. We always want to look at price levels of the stock market. Price levels are determined by where the stock market closes at the end of each day. They can tell us a great deal about the level of risk that we are facing.

If we manage to stay above certain price levels, then stock market investors should feel comfortable with taking risk by investing in stocks. However, if the market closes below certain price levels, then the probability increases that stock investors will lose substantial amounts of money. On June 11th, the S&P 500 reached its highest price level since the March low. That closing price level for June 11th was 944 on the S&P 500.

As of last Friday, we were at a price level of 879. The price level of 878 is the first level of risk for the stock market. Last week the S&P 500 fell below that level but has not closed below that level. Remember that the closing level is the most important one to watch. Once that level is broken, the next danger zone lies between 814 and 779. If you are heavily invested in stock, you do not want to see the S&P 500 fall below 779. In that event, I would think that the next price level down could be as low as 719 all the way down to 666.

The price level of 666 is extremely important because that was the March low of the stock market. In the event that would happen, that would be a considerable low and loss to stock market investors. For now, let’s not get ahead of ourselves. Keep in mind that investing in stocks is all about monitoring your risk. One of the best ways to do so is by monitoring price levels.

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